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20121027
20121104
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CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
. i am honored to be here and appreciate your interest in kent state and hiring education. a special welcome to all the penn staters here along with those of you covering a educational issues. we need your continued engagement. thank you for joining us and bringing along the penn state cookies. according to google news there are 45,000 stories about penn state and jerry sandusky. you have written them, you have read them and i imagine most of you have formed an opinion about and state in our actions over the last year. but beyond the headlines there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff and over 550,000 living alumni. it is a world of teaching research and service. a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, law school, 157 years of tradition. it is also in world that has continued to face ongoing controversy surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators and me. the legal process con
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:00pm EDT
former hedge fund analyst also discusses his career change to public educator. >> host: tell us a little bit about your book and the journey that you underwent before you started the khan academy which led you to writing this book? >> guest: the book, it's a little bit about that journey but really how that journey and formed what khan academy has become and how that formed what may be classrooms could become or what learning could be, not just a pie-in-the-sky kind of way but in a way that feels like we are in a kind of plexus plan and what is going on in the classroom. this whole adventure for me started very inadvertently. in 2004 i was working as an analyst at data hedge fund at the time. i just got married. family from new york lands visiting me in boston after the wedding and it turns out this one cousin was having trouble, 12 years old. i had trouble believing that. she is an extremely bright girl. we share the same dna. [laughter] and when i asked her, i asked her mom and asked nadia and she said oh no yeah. let me tutor you and i think she thought i was just bluffing. i said no
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 5:00pm EDT
education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is now and less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education first of all and in fact mr. smith you suggested eliminating the department of education altogether. is that the right plan at this moment? casey: the best place is that the state level. that is where between the local school boards, teachers and parents. now i don't -- i said i wanted to take a look at the department of education, and it's possible. but they do some good things so we don't want to throw that away. but we need -- any federal organizations basically as big as the department of education there is a lot waste. just to get that money to the states. they can do it themselves and that is a state issue but it would be more economical doing that. and we need to eliminate a lot o
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:00am EDT
higher education. >> another two or three minutes. >> one thing we talk about is another sign of racial preference, prominent in the discussion which is the diversity interest of schools. one of the things research has shown that we talk about in the book is how much the diversity affects, moderated by the academic distance, when you admit students with large preferences they are less likely to socially interact with peers of other raises. this is very well documented by research. there is also self doubt affects of low grades. one study found students who believe they were admitted on preference are more vulnerable to serious arms threat. diversity research when looked at carefully fits nicely into c-span2 -- "mismatch" findings, talking about these various effects, then we go into problems of institutional behavior and that is a large part of the problem. wanting to demonstrate these effects but it is another to get institutions of higher education to deal with that. when you only look of the lineup to see how uniform is the solidarity of higher education behind the sustained preferen
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 10:00pm EDT
the mismatch is something that affects a swath of the education. >> how much time do i have left? >> one of the things we talk about is another side of the racial preferences and the prominent in the discussions which is the diversity interest the schools and having a diverse racial climate. how much the diversity affects are moderated by the academic distance and the schools in other words when you add that students with large preferences they are much less likely to socially interact with your of the other races. this has been very well documented by the research. there's also self doubt affect into the stereotypes one study even taunt the students who believe they were admitted on a preference are more vulnerable. so the diversity of research when we look at it carefully it fits very nicely, it's very closely into the mismatched finance. so with all of this about half of the book talking devotees affect then we go into the problems of institutional behavior, and that is a large part of the problem. it's one thing to demonstrate these effects as they exist and the evidence does
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 4:45pm EST
informed and educated people good, informed decisions about the use of health care. is that everybody by any stretch, but at least we're beginning to see it, and rehearsing good doctors have good conversations with their patients about the appropriate use of resources. that is what the choosing campaign is all about and that's why i'm so delighted that you, as residents, will be learning, choosing wisely is part of your curriculum. better outcomes, better care and it cost less. abundant opportunities to do this. the way i think about health care, as how we deal with food. on the one hand we have an obesity epidemic that is off the charts. people eating too much food, the wrong kind of food, and at the same time we have pockets of communities where people are malnourished. we have this extraordinary imbalance. the same is true in health care. pockets of people who are getting too much medical care and yet we have people who can get what they need. if we can reduce the overuse and put that to good use for people who really needed we will have enough to take care of everyone. we have that o
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 8:00pm EDT
penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals further charges leveled yesterday. today, i want to tell you someth
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 2:00am EDT
ceased to do that. third was this body mass of education. the education is good in some pockets of the region and that in some. how can we use smarter principles, raced to the top, whatever. but it's really focused on what are the problems. let's take our breath and move on to the others. >> so that they take care and also folks have questions. the microphones are here. what i take from this conversation i want to get your response on the advice is to think about the city is a network of players, some very large, like a henry ford medical come even some of the cultural institutions, some of the employers, et cetera. a network of players who can take their own responsibility, obviously in partnership with the government around certain sets of issues. and the michael's point about what is the right issue to tackle because in the southeast, there's no water. last time i checked, you got lots of water, the great lakes. not your problem. but there's obviously a number of issues, whether it's run energy, education, health. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
these days. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal secu
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 5:00pm EDT
domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that they ar
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
necessarily covering beats but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to double that entire fire house that comes at him, -- fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those neighbor -- narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still -- fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 6:00am EDT
education to gobble the fire hoses, to put somebody and have them come up with the narrative they're going to follow or add new narrative's or subtract them but really try to explain and make sure people are enrolled because if they are not, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question. i am not thinking of any city in particular but with that kind of operation, in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange -- imagine that -- somebody who wanted -- very openly to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. just imagine if something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you to do more, to fill that void, or can't you fill the void of the newspaper? that city just out of luck? >> a couple things. first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism, the owners of the union tribune purchased the times for less than the owner sold his house for. the assets are completely collapsing in value. [talking over each other] but setting aside that, propert
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
important for us to make sure we are investing in the education and development of future capabilities and techniques and procedures. we've got to invest in that as we go forward. >> got into a short short follow-up on the? what does that approach apply -- apply for both contractors or? they become diminished. >> i mean, i think potentially they might ask little bit spent in terms of numbers spent in terms of numbers, but they will still play a role. they are not a limited at all spent how do you incorporate into planning what those numbers need to be? u.. >> based on their experiences. so i think that's what we're trying to capture is that right mix. what i'm saying right now is it's overbalanced. i'm trying to rebalance it again. >> got it. nate? >> yes, sir. there's a lot of discussion so far about what we want to do and can do. what are some of the areas specifically that you think that the army going forward can assume more risk in capability and competencies as we sort of deal with an era of declining or plateauing resources? >> yeah. i mean, i think it's not, i think risk and ca
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
to be. the education system in many respects encouraged that. you would go and get a postgraduate degree to work out how to make something an mba, maybe. you don't need anymore. the way of -- the tools are there for you to engage automatically. now, you just need to plug them together. there are these stories that are emerging that are allow you to wrap around the existing system. they don't support us. and they haven't supported these sorts of entrepreneurs but our tools do. that's the really vital thing. >> i think the best thing michigan can do or the city of detroit is literally a marketing campaign like knick key, you can do. everybody has ideas. and, i mean, i was in berlin, actually, there's a panel in berlin v detroit which is interesting. you can feel the energy building. there's a come plaintiff's exhibit over there of germans v the u.s. they feel like we are faster and innovative. what you're starting to sense is build the confidence they can do it as well. we're seeing more entrepreneurship come out of here. i feel that's detroit and began needs is the big campaign say
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 11:00am EDT
always figured, i had a feeling working hard in our country i could make it because education was very important to me. because of the limited educational opportunities i joined the u.s. 80 -- navy and spend four years in the military and applied for the u.s. border patrol and i was blessed with a tremendous career, tremendous family. i ended up along the border as u.s. border patrol agents going through the ranks and started using what i felt was a talent i was blessed with, being able to infiltrate drug cartels, human smuggling cartels and did more undercover work than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:45pm EST
energy, education, health care, transportation, and more. it's one of the most important and least understand pieces of legislation in modern history. the short-term recovery part as well as the long-term reinvest part. always the pure is disstillation of what obama meant by change. a major down payment on owl of his biggest campaign promises, and the story of the stimulus is not only, i think, kind of fun and gripping story, but it's a microcosm of the obama era. it's the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements, and his troubled marketing those achievements in a city that's gone bonkers. it's also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about and it imagined it must be there. but i actually got some of these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell planned their path back to power. so, before i open this up to whatever you want to talk about. i want to talk about the stimulus, becau
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project under i
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 8:00am EST
education and higher education act, which is a profusion of federal money that is going into education. you see high school graduations. enrollment of college rise, dramatically as a result of this. 60% of all student loans today are derived not higher education. the same year, medicare, the arts and humanities act, which creates the national endowment for the arts. the clean air act. the most important civil rights act in our history. it gives people of color power of the ballot and the immigration act, which opens the gates and our borders people all over the world and fundamentally changes the face and heart of america. this is in one single year. i will tell you is a presidential historian. there are those that would stake their entire domestic reputations on this one of those laws. lbj did all those things in one single year. in 1965. [applause] >> reading these books, reading both of these books, i was struck with such awe and admiration of these people. even with all of those lbj's foibles, which many of us are familiar with. i am a true believer for evermore afterwards. mike, w
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
, and i will not join your cause. it's that same man who founded public education who single handedly rammed through the money and put the final shingles on. the young students in tucson said our history matters, and we're willing to fight to keep it because to our great amazement, part of the sphere, russell said teaching mexican-american history and literature was anti-american, is seditious, even though they had been here for centuries. they passed a law that didn't go after ethnic studies, but after one single program in tucson that produced the highest test scores, highest graduation rates, that had to change the achievement gap, that had been instituted because of the federal desegregation order, that had been a response to no child left bind. you know, when you have high rates of dropouts, one program that should have been rep kateed, one that nationally would have reached kids with culturally relevant curriculum, and i got a call saying they are shutting it down. they are calling it sedition. the kids took over the school board, chained themselves saying our history matters. w
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 11:00pm EDT
of the men but they had no friends who could educate with southern politics. so lincoln's image of the slave south matched the abolitionists depiction to dominate society and politics agitating for secession with slave owners. lincoln appears to have no understanding or how deeply slavery is invented the with the overwhelmingly majority it seems linkdin thought of them with no attachment to slavery there were very much like abraham again. perhaps southern whites could not imagine a pro slave or against the yen. and actively supportive session but it springfield illinois he and his friend urged lincoln and with the republican triumph. there are no such men. with no firsthand knowledge of the south and no real friends to share acquaintances, lincoln unsurprisingly did not knowledge the distinction between those advocates and others said their politicians and had no relish just like jefferson davis and alexander stephens who becomes the confederate vice president. lincoln put them altogether. he does not seem to understand being pressed by the southern regulators. but it powerfully po
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:30pm EDT
transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the new set of tenures doubled. >> it didn't double. dold: it did. now after two years it is doubling, and so i do think this is wildly troubling b
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
done a lot of work with educators and c-span and people kept saying what is the real brian lamb light? he did not want a biography done and i pumped him and pumped them and i finally got a contracted the one and i find it came in and i said well, what do you think lexi said well, i guess i will do it and i can't say no. the nation is committed to open access information and how can i close things out? it's a wonderful story. a kind of open doors for me so that was kind of fun to do. prior to that i did have look that looked at individuals who change national policy called citizen democracy and it's a bunch of profiles of individuals unelected, unappointed individuals who went out and created things like major legislation because of their actions. >> what do you teacher at the naval academy? >> i teach political silent. i'm proud of the fact that for the last 30 years we have been the number one and people don't assume that a technical school. they get their technical education plus science education. i teach media politics and campaigns and elections and i have my finger and the
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 7:00am EDT
. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term he gave his search -- first speech on vietnam. in 1970 he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984 he urged our american leadership to understand the complexity that challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that doesn't mean his campaign was a failure. 1972 campaign to open the political process that infused a new generation with the belief in what eleanor called the politics of the impossible. that kind of politics that george and the enormous respect across the aisle and transcended partisan lines and along with it enormous, enormous achievement. there are children today, and jim mcgovern mentioned it, children today in the world living and have better lives
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 8:30am EDT
and education and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. e. republican congressman robert dold and democratic challenger brad schneider are in a tight race for the tenth congressional district. it covers an area along part of michigan in the northern chicago severs. representative dold is running for a second term and brad schneider is the founder of the management controlling firm. the two candidates recently sat down for a debate, courtesy of chicago's wttw tv. >> the tenth congressional district has one of the most expensive congressional races in the country. as democrats try to take control for the first time in more than three years. they are aided by the recent remap of the district which makes it the most democratic congressional district in the country held by republican. the newly drawn tenth congressional district runs along made lake michigan and the wisconsin border and includes northern suburbs such as waukegan buffalo road and glen glen cove. a couple of quick notes before we began. this form is being streamed live on our web s
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
definition, that you are hurting defense. we would not necessarily accept any cut hurts education or that any cuts but when it's defense -- [inaudible] secondly, a lot of conservatives say that the beneficiaries of this defense spending say that it will be bad if we cut the spending. therefore, i briefly, we cannot cut the spending. but that is not what logic conservatives would accept with any other kind of government senators. when teachers say honestly the best thing we can do to stimulate the economy is hire more teachers. well, the answer to that is, of course they would say that, they are teachers. i think the best thing to stimulate the economy is to hire more conservative journalist. [laughter] >> i think it is just self-evident that that would work. [laughter] >> that is logic to consider that it rejects other forms of federal spending. there is also a form of keynesianism that sweeps into conservative economic thinking once you get into defense spending. they begin to talk about the loss of jobs at the close on a military base and the multipliers that we have is the hairdresser
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:45pm EDT
haven't ticket. is that history. it's more entertaining than is educational. it's one thing that genre can add to actual history. >> what is your day job? >> i teach at george washington university. >> talking here with thomas mallon. >>> now book tv, joan walsh presenter falls on the state of the american middle class and what should be done to ensure future opportunities for all americans. this is just over an hour. >> that's my favorite part. [laughter] good evening and welcome to today's meeting of the commonwealth of california. the place where you are in the know. i am dug sovereign political reporter at kcbs radio in san francisco and i will be a moderator for this evening's program. please insure your cell phone, pda and other noisemaking devices are turned off for at least on silence. and we will get underway in just a moment. first i'd like to tell you about some upcoming programs. this thursday, september 27, melanie, financial commentator for abc's good morning america, and paul schott stevens who is the ceo of the investment company institute will team up to discuss the fu
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 6:45pm EDT
like to make sure that we're able to provide a quality education to every single young child in st. louis. think about how difficult that is. then you think about what that challenge is like in a refugee camp, what's that is like, no classrooms, no curriculum, no building. part of the reasons they did that successfully in the camp was because a lot of young people stepped forward saying i'm going to volunteer, find a way to serve. one of the lessons in the warrior's heart is that if you're in a place in your life where things are hard, difficult, and you might be afraid, and there's hardship is that you actually become stronger when you find ways to be of service in your school, you find ways to be of service in the community and of the world, and not only does that help the world around you, but that actually makes you stronger. what was neat for me to see was how this started to take off in the refugee camps. there was a boy who was 15 years old, no budget, no supplies. he just had one soccer ball, and what he would do every afternoon is take the soccer ball out, and this was app
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
mentioned. and it was not in our history, any idea why that could be? >> he was educated in australia and there was quite a comprehensive education on the topic of the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing whatsoever on the war of 1812 and why might that be? well, the british i think did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 as a particularly significant event at all. for the british it, this was just one small, kind of sideshow in the midst of a global war with napoleon. so for them the war of 1812 is the one happening on the european continent and around the globe. not the one happening in north america. that might have something to do with what is taught in australia. the fact of the matter it was not taught very much here either i think for some of the reasons that i outlined. if you look at this in military and diplomatic terms it didn't change very much for the united states. but i think it is worth taking a new look at it from a cultural perspective and thinking about what it means to declare war in a democracy and how you use popular culture to mo
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 9:00am EDT
-up questions. part of the issues education for people in the audience is, you write these reports. who do you think your audience is? >> with multiple audiences. our audience is partly -- we have an obligation by statute to report both to the attorney general, the head of the agency and to congress to keep them currently and fully informed of any problems we found. so our audiences are multiple. one, it's the agency itself, the people who are running the program. two, the congress which has oversight over the programs, and i think they have an important right to know. and three, two large extent the american people. the american people have a right to know how their government is operating, it is having problems, have how it can be improved. we thought we should make that known and write our report for those multiple audiences because i always told people we need to write us a technical expert technical expert understands and recognizes that there's benefit in the report, and by. we need to write it so that a member of congress who picks it up will understand what's going on and o
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 2:00pm EDT
for a second about what it is like to make sure we are able to provide a quality education to every single young child in st. louis. think about how difficult that is and what the challenge is like in a refugee camp and what that is like, no classroom or curriculum or buildings. parts of the reason they were able to do that successfully is a lot of young people stepped forward and said i am going to find a way to volunteer and one of the lessons in "the warrior's heart" is if you are at a place in your life where earnings are difficult and you might be afraid, you actually become stronger when you find ways to be in service with schools and in service in your community and in the world not only does it help the people around you it makes you stronger. what was needed was how this started to take off in the refugee camp. one boy was 15 years old and had no budget, no supplies. all he had was one sucker ball and set up a soccer team for younger kids in the camp. one message that we want to get across in "the warrior's heart" is it is a message for young people, you can find a way to s
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 11:00pm EDT
to students who didn't go out with them, educational process. they had teach-ins. they didn't look at screens all the time they didn't have e-mail, and they had to face-to-face each other. in cafeterias, you'd have argument and discussion about the major confrontations. it did help to have the draft, part of the risk, part of the solution. your generation needs to sober up, get out of virtual reality more, get into reality, and realize there's no change without person-to-person mobilization in real life. you can get information off the interpret. you can find out about events in the internet, nothing happens without real life exchange, and that's what the occupy wall street tried to show in this three months last year when they had the eye of the mass media, encampments, 24 hours a day. now, i can overcome anything in an audience but a little baby. this is about your future, little baby. [laughter] sleep away for awhile. [laughter] now, let me discuss something personal in terms of all of us. the theme of this book is that democracy works, that it's a lot easier than you think, tha
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 6:00am EDT
health care as a human right. i'm the only candidate that supports funding for education, free public education through university. and i think we need new leadership in congress, we need progressive leadership and we also need progressive taxes. neither of my opponents tax plans would actually address the deficit. we can raise $1.2 trillion of flashes deficit through progressive taxation like we had in the eisenhower years. i will close by saying that our people and our plan, we need actions and we commitment and that's why i ask voters to vote for me on november 6 because real solutions can't wait. >> moderator: ann marie buerkle. buerkle: thank you again for this opportunity. when i ran for office three years ago i made a pledge to the district, it will have to be compact and for. we promise we will be accessible, responsible, accountable and independent. we've had 40 plus town hall meetings. with a 60 mobile download units. we have been, we've met with hundreds of people in its history, farmers, business owners, women, seniors. we have been accessible and would have been accountab
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:00pm EST
very, very intelligent, well-educated, well-spoken woman with great opinions -- strong opinions but who also has a reputation, earned, for liking the very comfortable lifestyle, and here in the white house she has people taking care of her every want and wish. she, as you know, has gone on many, many vacations, some of them quite controversial, to spain and to the ski slopes in the west of the united states. she spent at one point during a period of several months, 42 days on vacation. she is living the life of a very pampered woman, and apparently this fits with her personality. >> host: you write, whereas the clintons were open and aboveboard about their co-presidency, boasting hillary was an equal partner with bill, the own bamas have hidden the fact that michelle is one of his major advise you'res and he listens to her. >> guest: that's true. the way she does that is often through her very best friend. how she gets her opinions through. her very best friend, valerie jarrett. valerie jarrett is a woman who hired michelle many, many years ago, to work with her in mayor daly's admi
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 3:00pm EDT
educated for.rn namely the military.ely th yet it came with two higher prefixes. i never had either ambition orer case where political life. yet i was twice president of the united states. ates one of the striking things to mr on writing the story washis y observing how he did and mostlyv did not changein personally, asp became this world historicals figure. when the civil war began, grant was living in the lena,is. illinois. one thing after another had feln for him. in sad failed as a farmer, he had failed and selling real urtate, he had failed sellingels insurance. he finally had to fall back ondo the long-standing offer from his father, who really thought that grant had very few gifts at all. at a and he went to work for histo younger brother in the family leather store. he was fully consigned -- excuse me, he was fully resigned to a life of mediocrity. worl the world never would've heard of ulysses grant, he was not onf who had any burning ambition. ambe had not been essentiallyrg handed the presidency, it never would've occurred to him to seek it.have occur he definitely did no
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 7:00pm EDT
care. >> moderator: steve woods? woods: beginning an answer is education. we have a large infrastructure here in maine. maine is the size of many other states combined. we have a little economic engine. it is nobody's fault. it is the way that state is laid out. the answer is for us to continue. years ago, people competed in commerce and we had cars and air transportation. we are now in the global marketplace. i was just in california and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, we don't focus on being more competitive or more grants. >> moderator: cohead 3 >> moderator: cohead >> it is due to the fact that our government hasn't been able to work together like everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things. it is equitably distributed. when i want to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reforms. and the evidence of benghazi. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question. >> i have campaigned with people all over the state. i think the best
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00am EDT
education 1964. strom thurmond is the recordholder to stay at the longest one-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influen
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 9:30am EDT
. [laughter] >> thank you very much for all the great work you do and helped david horowitz educate america that have very unchain really badly needs it. every -- >> they sent right-wingers like david and me to college campuses where often the only conservative campuses but here in four years of college at syracuse university a few years ago, i usually have dinner with college republicans afterwards. on one of them told me about everything happening at a green party meeting. i said finally, what are you a mall? how do you know? he said no, used to be green. i said what are you doing at the member of the republican click now? and he said he spoke year after 9/11 and nobody else is making sense. you were the only person who made sense, so i became a republican. [applause] there's a reason they don't want college students to hear me and david. >> that kind of that kind of leads me to make two part question is then surrounded by so many liberals have informed opinion, but only on half the information. i say what it should try listening fox news or ann coulter or david horowitz or some t
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 7:00am EDT
had no friends that could educate them about the south and about southern politics. the record indicates that lincoln's image of the slave south basically matched by common abolitionists and firm in anti-slavery depictions. and the south, this south, dominated society and politics. in 1860, 1861 advocate for succession and towering non-slaveowners but lincoln appears to have had no understanding either of the widespread ownership of slaves among whites, or how deeply slavery had become embedded in saudi society. instead of comprehending that the overwhelming majority of southern whites were committed to their slave society, it seems that lincoln thought of them as conservative unionists with little attachment to slavery. in other words, they were very much like abraham lincoln, except perhaps without his moral outrage towards slavery. perhaps the mass of southern whites could not or would not act against slavery, but lincoln could not imagine him either pro-slave, nor on their own acting against the union. i south where non-planters, even non-slaveowners have a voice, republica
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
writes just weeks before he dies i never thought of acquiring rank in the profession i was educated for, namely the military. yet it came with two grades higher prefix to the rank of general officer for me. i certainly never had either ambition or taste for political life, yet are was twice president of the united states. one of the striking things to me on writing this story was observing how grant did and mostly did not change personally as he became this world historical figure. when the civil war began, grant was living in illinois. one thing after another had failed for him. he failed as a farmer and failed in selling real estate and failed selling insurance. he finally had to fall back on longstanding offer from his father who really thought ulysses grant had very few gifts at all. and he went to work for his younger brother in the family leather store. he was full the resigned to life of mediocrity. if the war had not come, the world never would have heard of ulysses grant. he was not one who had any burning ambition. if he had not been essentially handed the presidency, it n
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
are investing in the education and development of future capabilities and practice techniques. and we invest in that as we go forward. >> a follow-up question on that. what does that imply were those army civilians? >> i think potentially, they might a little bit. they play a role, but they are not limited at all. >> how we incorporate the planning with those numbers need to be? particularly on the contractors contractor's site? >> i think that what we do, what they want to do -- you want to have the right balance. because again, capabilities that we simply don't have, and that is what they will focus on. they require to do with continuity and consistency that we need. and then we need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and sometimes it validates what we are trying to do based on expenses. so i think that is what we are trying to capture. >> what i am saying it is his overbalance. i'm trying to rebalance it. >> got it. >> anything else? >> there is a lot of discussion about what we want to do and can do. what are some of the areas that you think of
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
department of education, and we thank the department for its recognition of our asian studies program title vi, national resources center for east asia. it's fitting we gather today for this conversation just days before the presidential election. the topic of our discussion will take on increasing importance for our president in the next four years. secretary of state hillary clinton who offered a foreign policy address on this very stage just two weeks ago has written in foreign policy about the growing significance of the u.s. asian relationship. she wrote, one of the most important tasks of american statecraft over the next decade will be to lock in a substantially increased investment, diplomatic, economic, strategic and otherwise in the asia-pacific region. the secretary went on to describe the work ahead. success requires maintaining and advancing a bipartisan consensus on the importance of the asia-pacific to our national interests. we seek to build upon a strong tradition of engagement by presidents and secretaries of state, of both parties, across many decades. the breath an
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 12:00pm EDT
public-interest that educate the public and by contrast its secrets the press does investigative journalism that's how they get information. wikileaks sets of these internet lockboxes designed to collect classified information in a way that can skirt the law against the disclosure so you've got these distinctions between the methods and the missions of wikileaks such that if they decide to bring a case in wikileaks, i have some confidence that the rest of the press is not going to be chilled but it's tough to draw and it's getting tougher and tougher with other news being disseminated by the sort of alternative routes. we will take questions from the audience in a few minutes. picking up again on the judge's comment about the classification of misclassification but also on the discussion on the hard issues that are posed by the illegitimate whistle-blower motivated to disclose some kind of wrong doing. one asks about which a lot in the cases and some of the case is about the discovery in the civil lawsuits but the idea is perhaps if the government conduct is arguably unlawful in
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
bring up is you are very good with important ideas of somehow educating people to that. and spreading the word in a way that the sky is not falling, but the clouds are out there and there is a lot going on. and people have to learn that so that they start to behave differently and they start becoming amenable to the series demand for better personal hygiene on the network. >> so today's the last day of cybersecurity awareness month. where it has been a challenge. one of the things, i think is that we need higher-level awareness there is a question about when you look at what abilities, do you look at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second poi
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:00am EDT
men have adapted easily but at this period, education and credentials. economy is fast-changing and who knows what it will throw at us? women are getting those killed and credentials that a faster rate than men are and seem to be more nimble and that filters into our society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and notions of fatherhood and what men can or cannot do in families or how young people have sex and make decisions and you start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: we have heard there's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 9:15am EDT
. like most americans, worried about education in america. every president as long as i can remember has been the education president. he is going to be the guy. i wanted to fulfill that thing. i have another thing. arthur miller said the best thing you can hope for is the end up with the right regrets. i have this regret, one of my regrets that i was not the best student. i didn't understand the teacher was trying real hard and that was his life for her life's work and i was one of those guys who tried to jar my way through and do as little as possible to get by. if i spend as much time studying as a did conniving i would have been all right. i have that regret too and it is one of the things that we have to deal with now if we are going to fix education, the kids have to understand that this is a very important moment in their lives and it is not like it was when i was a kid that you could fool around. i got lucky but even if you didn't, in those days you could get an assembly line jobs and have a middle-class life because the country would give you that but that is not the way it
CSPAN
Oct 30, 2012 8:00pm EDT
huge sectors of the economy -- education, health care, energy -- that haven't really been disrupted that much in the last 25 years, what i think of as the first internet revolution, getting everybody to believe it was important, get connected, multiple devices, multiple networks, that's sort of been accomplished. the second revolution is how you use the mobility of the internet to transform other aspects of life. those are worthy, you know, great entrepreneurs across the country are supporting, and they are the industries that are going to drive, you know, the future. initially, it was sort of the agriculture revolution, kind of, you know, the midwest and then sort of the industrial revolution and then sort of the finance and media revolution, more recently the technology revolution, the next wave is where we need to be positioned as a nation, and we really need to recognize these entrepreneurs are in some ways american heroes, too, because they're the ones who are taking the risk of starting these companies that can change the world, but also make sure we have a robust, growing eco
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 6:00pm EDT
students ended up educating each other, and we learned a lot. i learned a lot. it was--i got a very good education at city college, not all of it in the classroom. c-span: you talk about the different alcoves where people sat. >> guest: yes. c-span: which one were you in? >> guest: alcove one, which was the anti-communist or anti-stalinist alcove, where socialists of various kinds and some liberals would congregate and argue and exchange ideas, and it was a very nice alcove. it was my second home. c-span: was that in the cafeteria? >> guest: yes. all the alcoves were--when--were in an arc around the cafeteria. c-span: anybody in that alcove that we would know? any names we would recognize? >> guest: oh, yes, some of them anyhow: daniel bell, melvin lasky, philip selznick, now professor emeritus of sociology at berkeley; seymour martin lipset, also had been a professor for many years at berkeley. a lot of people who became fairly well-known academics were in that--irving howe was in that alcove, became a well-known literary critic. so in terms of subsequent careers, the alcove produc
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 11:00am EDT
and parts of trying to move forward is being legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who aft
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 4:00pm EDT
spillover, to what extent have you noticed after to educate the local human population on how to modify their lifestyle or better to avoid the crossover spillover? >> there's certainly a first in bangladesh trying to educate people not to drink broad date palm sap that could potentially contain the virus. if you cook the stuff, you can kill the virus, but people like to drink it raw. it is sort of a seasonal treat. so there are things like that around the world. in southern china, that cracked down on at least the above ground. there's a black market, but the big wet markets were all kinds of wildlife are sold life for food. there's passion in southern china, they call it wild flavor. it's sort eating wildlife. not because people need protein for subsistence, but because they have money and this is considered to be very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education and local people. i mentioned the original spillover of hiv occurred in southeastern cameroon. i went there to retrace it was probably the reader to coming out of south eastern down a river system that
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 5:00pm EDT
league influences public policy through education and advocacy. membership is open to all citizens of voting age, male and female. the league is an organization that does not endorse or oppose any of the local candidate or party. the league does make an effort to obtain factual information on a candidate's views and issues and then distributes this information as widely as possible. our purpose in holding this is to help you, the citizens, understand the candidates reasons and qualifications for seeking public office. to help potential voters better understand the issues that are facing congress and encourage citizens in the district to vote in the general election on november 6, 2012 only three weeks from today. a very important part of tonight's forum is the questions that you will be asking and you will have a chance to ask these candidates. we do have some ground rules. first and foremost you'll notice there are a couple of video cameras. other than that, there will be no ideography, photographs, smartphone videos, anything of the sort tolerated. and then also, turn your cell p
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